A warm welcome to all friends visiting the site with a loving invitation to read my personal expressions on movies, music, poetry and life.

Music and Movies are like Ears and Eyes to me and if you also feel the same, then you are going to enjoy every moment spent on my works here, for sure.

Do send in your valuable comments and suggestions as they would be my guide for all the future works.

ENJOY!

ISLAND CITY (Hindi) - A not to be missed extremely intelligent take on life that puts you on a serious thinking mode like an innovative, experimental, thought provoking book. (Review by Bobby Sing) (Movies To See Before You Die - Drama).

PARCHED (Hindi) - The positive wave continues with a story of 3 strong rural women, but this time especially made for the international/festival audience having many forced cliches. (Review by Bobby Sing).

BANJO - Why we keep going back to the same old subjects and then expect them to be a success taking the viewers as granted? (Review By Bobby Sing).

RAAZ REBOOT - Yet another similar and poorly made project to fool us in the name of horror. (Review By Bobby Sing).

PINK - Do watch this hard-hitting new age DAMINI, especially for Amitabh's SAFETY MANUAL for girls, boldly ripping off our visible social hypocrisy and sick biased mindsets. (A detailed overview by Bobby Sing).

FREAKY ALI - Avoiding a complete copy of HAPPY GILMORE, Sohail makes a highly inspired Indianised version that's neither entertaining nor exciting full of cliched and predictable moments leading to boredom. (Review By Bobby Sing).

BAAR BAAR DEKHO - Another unexciting, lengthy and feeble (read boring) inspired attempt to make a 'Time-Travel' film in Hindi cinema, missing the entertainment factor. (Review By Bobby Sing).

This Friday's ONE LINE REVIEWS for your weekend plans - by Bobby Sing.

A mesmerizing sensual love song from SHEHNAI (1964) and the hidden unique beauty in its lyrics. (Articles on Hindi Film Music by Bobby Sing) - BTC Exclusive..

DON'T BREATHE (English) - A fine tense psycho-thriller that actually becomes superfine in its final 40 minutes. (Review by Bobby Sing).

 
 
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October 01, 2016 Saturday     
With three fine acts by Irrfan Khan, Jimmy Shergil and Vishesh Bansal (the kid), MADAARI is once again a Nishikant Kamat film that falls short of delivering the desired impact despite having an interesting subject and the valuable support of a talented team. Made on a similar pattern reminding you of Nishikant’s own DOMBIVLI FAST (2005-Marathi), Neeraj Pandey’s A WEDNESDAY (2008) and also Irrfan Khan enacted DEADLINE SIRF 24 GHANTE (2006 – with a similar role involving a kid too), MADAARI can easily be called an unofficial inspired sequel of these films lacking a lot in perfection, logic and conviction missing the bull’s eye.
However what still leaves a strong mark in this half-heartedly made social thriller are the well written dialogues and a supremely engaging or rather revealing climax keeping you glued to the screen (ending on an abrupt note). As a result, here we have a film that could have been a strong surprise winner like A WEDNESDAY, but sadly fails to be the same as the director doesn’t play the game too seriously following a pretty ordinary, casual story progression full of big loopholes as indicated in the following short notes.
  • The film opens with a great impressive quote referring to a small bird fighting with an eagle. The kidnapping of the Home Minister’s son is straight away announced through media coverage and Jimmy yet again plays the police officer leading the investigating team.
  • The director follows the 'to and fro' kind of execution inserting the flashbacks at regular intervals and the one liners intelligently incorporated in the dialogues provide the entertainment.
  • The first sequence between Irrfan and the kid with reference of child abuse works well.
  • Jimmy looking above his glasses bending the neck looks realistic but Irrfan’s long hair and beard doesn’t.
  • Dialogues continue making an impact commenting upon the questionable media and corrupt political system together.
  • The pace is superfine with both Irrfan and Jimmy excelling in their given roles, but only if one decides to ignore the big loopholes relating to the kidnap, the hideout and their constant travel.
  •  After 40 minutes, the film tends to become monotonous but just then a flashback accompanied by an impressive background score touches you emotionally, followed by a well-written and skillfully rendered song, which again goes into high notes after the first two lines following the current trend. (Can’t figure out Why shouting can be found in almost every song today, even in the so called sad ones?)
                                          ----- INTERVAL -----
  • Post interval the narration begins on a tense note becoming more political and the director brings in FACEBOOK and personal video uploads into the proceedings, hinting towards a Kangaroo Court.
  • Rajasthan and its famous attires are used, probably to make it visually appealing.
  • One particular dialogue on FB reveals the actual scenario perfectly, wherein Irrfan says, “Duniya Kal Meri Taraf Thi, Aaj Uski Taraf Hai” (not in these exact words)
  • Another song and lot of creative liberties taken kill the pace again but the revelation of a cruel tragedy makes you feel the pain in a realistic, heart wrenching manner. However, much less movement of the handheld camera in the scene certainly would have resulted in a deeper impact.
  • A typical sound in the background score reminds you of ‘the Dumroo’ (the musical instrument) played by a Madaari in his street shows and this is where the writer-director play a good trick with the viewer heading towards an engrossing 15 minutes finale.
  • Though the entire climax is based on highly unbelievable assumptions and illogical proceeding full of many cartoonish characters far away from reality. Still it successfully manages to hold you well and the revealing dialogues remain the major working force behind it all.
  • However just when you expect the film to end on an another insightful note, a sudden abrupt conclusion spoils the entire build-up, bringing back the casual, confused vision of the director - who once upon a time gave us a worth watching gem as MUMBAI MERI JAAN (2008).
Summing it all, MADAARI solely survives due to Irrfan Khan, the impressive dialogues and an engaging finale alone keeping the interest alive. Otherwise its a very casually made film full of many cardboard characters and illogical proceedings that remains the first thing to be avoided while making a though provoking social-revolutionary thriller, following a classic like A WEDNESDAY.
Rating : 2.5 + 0.5 / 5 (With the additional 0.5 for its socially relevant and revealing dialogues)
Tags : Madaari Film Review by Bobby Sing, Madaari Review by Bobby Sing, Inspired Films, Inspired from A Wednesday-Deadline-Dombivli Fast, Similar theme films, New Bollywood Movies Released, New Hindi Films Reviews, New Hindi Movies Reviews, New Hindi Movies Released, New Bollywood Reviews, Bobby Talks Cinema Review, Reviews By Bobby Sing, New Hindi Films Reviews at bobbytalkscinema.com
 
 
23 July 2016 / bobbysing /
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The biggest star of Punjabi Cinema (Diljit) playing a character he is best known for, one of the most innovative directors of ‘music videos circle’ with some huge projects in his repertoire (Gifty) making his proud film debut, the nostalgic narrow lanes of old Delhi used as an immensely likable colourful backdrop and a comic theme revolving around cunning property dealers (vaguely inspired from the basic plot of KHOSLA KA GHOSLA), certainly seems to be an exciting premise for an enjoyable Punjabi comedy film tilted MUKHTIAR CHADHA along with some catchy upbeat tracks raising the expectation level.
But sadly, the above mentioned potential elements appear to be great only on paper, as the film simply fails to present them all in any collective enjoyable form disappointing many, particularly the family audience expecting some great entertaining cinema from Diljit and his team post SARDAR JI.
In fact such is the substandard, upsetting result of this big project (reportedly stuck in the making for a long time) that one wonders that did they really had anything in hand as a storyline or script to shoot their various sequences at all? Because the film is just like a sum of many poor gags put together in a silly rush and all we have is the lead character and nothing else to be precise in the name of story progression or plotline heading towards a clumsy climax.
In exact words, here we have a Hindi speaking friend who keeps annoying right from the beginning quite pathetically, a leading lady (Oshin Brar) unable to make any connection with the viewers whatsoever and a big display of overacting from the ‘Mama Ji’ along with the typical mother played by the veteran Kiran Juneja. Besides there are many deliberately added ‘over the top’ characters too like the thin funny gangster (Khyaali), a poetry loving land-grabber (Yashpal Sharma), a big well-built person with a girlish voice and a middle aged Bihari man being repeatedly fooled on the phone, that are unable to generate any laughter in the theater ruining all the big expectations from the film. Moreover it’s the cliched sequences of a funny Ramlila being played on stage, a 10-faced Ravan riding a scooter (straight away reminding you of Akshay Kumar’s scene in TASHAN) and the ridiculous machine gun firing in the climax, that strongly pull down MUKHTIAR CHADHA to even below the level of mediocre to be honest. However the biggest shock comes post intermission, when we get to witness the weirdest scene of a ‘graphically created girl’ inserted without any reason at all, simply forcing you to ask, ‘What the hell they are really up to as a creative team?”
In the technical department, the songs as well as the cinematography do keep trying to give the film its much required lift sincerely, but the background music keeps ruining their noticeable impact adding all kinds of variety sounds in its distinctive sequences. In short there is only one enjoyable element in MUKHTIAR CHADHA and that is the performance of its leading man Diljit Dosanjh alone, who just marginally saves the film from being a complete disaster.
However as fans and enthusiastic viewers of Punjabi movies, everyone was certainly awaiting a much better, polished, well written and maturely directed product from the team of Diljit and Gifty together.
Rating : 1 / 5
Tags : Mukhtiar Chadha Review By Bobby Sing, Mukhtiar Chadha Punjabi Film Review by Bobby Sing, New Punjabi Films Reviews by Bobby Sing, New Punjabi Films Released, New Punjabi Films Reviews at bobbytalkscinema.com, Punjabi Cinema Reviews at BTC, Punjabi Movies Reviews by Bobby Singh at bobbytalkscinema
 
 
07 December 2015 / bobbysing /
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If after watching a film you have all praises for its lead actor, art direction and background score, but are not willing to praise the film on the whole as any entertaining experience at all, then that’s a clear failure for the makers, unable to make any kind of connection with the general viewers, which is unfortunately the case with the much awaited MAIN AUR CHARLES made on the real life stories of Charles Sobhraj, a conman/serial killer active towards the end of the last century.
Recalling the news bulletins/newspapers of those decades I personally remember Sobhraj’s criminal deeds being read and discussed with the element of an ‘entertaining awe’ and most of the people imagining him as a charming, clever hero of some Hindi pulp fiction novel, forgetting all about the blood and murders associated with his big-name willingly.  So following the same pattern, one expected the bio-pic of such a controversial-likable personality to be an equally exciting watch depicting ‘the cat & mouse games’ played with the Police in a truly entertaining manner making the best of the opportunity given.
However it was really sad to see the film turning out to be nothing but a mere stylized portrayal of Charles’s happening life scoring much less on the content level disappointing many.
Giving the deserving credit to its visible merits, yes here we have Randeep Hooda truly enacting the character with an impressive, mesmerizing elegance using a fine mix of language, make-up and dialogue-delivery creating a hypnotic kind of impact (just like the real life Charles), an intelligent re-creation of the gone era by the art-directors, a pulsating background score (though there is no innovation tried by the composers following the past hits) and a talented cast ensemble in the key roles making it an enjoyable film for the viewers just interested in the technical part of the creation ignoring everything else.
On the other hand, when you take into consideration its less engaging script progression, the ‘more than required’ artistic style of narration, not so clearly spoken dialogues having a foreign accent, the deliberated inserted skin-show, lackluster music (ruining another golden hit “Jab Chhaye Mera Jadoo”), avoidable dumb characters as of Mandana Karimi and no detailed attention given on the ‘How he did it all’ part of the biography, MAIN AUR CHARLES seems to be a pretty confused product trying to cater the classes as well as the masses together following a jumbled vision of its director Parwaal Raman. As a result despite the honest efforts put in by Adil Hussain, Richa Chaddha and Vipin Kumar it doesn’t reach out to the general viewers willing to see something exciting as well as entertaining made on the life of a negative but interesting French-Indian-Vietnamese personality of Charles Sobhraj.
Having said that, MAIN AUR CHARLES does hold you tight in its final 40 minutes showcasing the jail-break sequence and the link established with the opening scene of his murders committed in Thailand. Plus it has some exceptional strokes too played occasionally like focusing on the book ‘Mein Kampf’ in Sobhraj’s personal collection, the old Black & White classic being played in the jail for the selected inmates and the warden referring to him as ‘Sir’. Yet, one honestly misses the finer details and is forced to think that the potential subject and figure surely deserved a much better film from the makers materializing on the golden chance.
Moreover the film also couldn’t give me answers for many significant questions in mind. Like what was his early childhood about, where did he learn his various arts of influencing/hypnotizing people, how he used to charge for his interviews and discuss copyrights of his personal life-content, did the ‘Charles' in his name have anything to do with ‘Charlie Chaplin’ (as it is rumoured), what were his views about India in particular, what happened to him after the Indian chapter, where is he now and what’s in his mind at the present after spending so many years in the jails of various countries? (The questions Google answers much better than the film!)
Anyway, where MAIN AUR CHARLES successfully manages to score on technical grounds, it fails to do the same in terms of ‘connecting with the general audience’ as desired. But you can still see it for the style quotient and Randeep Hooda in particular who simply nails it playing Charles Sobhraj …..unarguably.
Rating : 2+1 / 5 (with an addition 1 just for Randeep Hooda’s efforts and presentation.)
Tags : Main Aur Charles Review by Bobby Sing, Main Aur Charkes Film Review by Bobby Sing, Biographical Hindi films, Hindi film on life of Charles Sobhraj, New Bollywood Movies Released, New Hindi Films Reviews, New Hindi Movies Reviews, New Hindi Movies Released, New Bollywood Reviews, Bobby Talks Cinema Review, Reviews By Bobby Sing, New Hindi Films Reviews at bobbytalkscinema.com
 
 
02 November 2015 / bobbysing /
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