"Take movies, music, poetry out of life & its gone!"
 
RDB-Asha-Gulzar’s first non-filmi album that was way ahead of its times. – By Bobby Sing
04 Jan, 2018 | Articles on Music, Poetry and Life

Pop-Music or Private Albums with tracks not related with any film music was largely an alien genre in Indian music scenario in the 80s that actually gained ground in the next decade, post the cable TV revolution in the country bringing in the trend of music channels and music videos opening many new avenues for the talented artists.

Hence towards the late 80s, when R. D. Burman, Asha Bhosle and Gulzar came up with their 2 cassette album titled DIL PADOSI HAI in 1987, I couldn’t decide whether to spend my pocket money saved on its purchase or not, being unaware or familiar with its out of the routine non-filmy content. Still in my early teens studying in class 9th, film music was the only genre I was familiar with apart from devotional music (Shabads and Bhajans) or Ghazals (occasionally bought by the elders). Becoming fan of individual creators in the music field was still a few years away and the only name I used to follow or be a die-hard fan of, was the one and only Amitabh Bachchan.

As a matter of fact, we did have one Pop-Album in our cassettes collection, probably gifted by a friend titled DISCO DEEWANE by Nazia Hassan, who became immensely popular in India post her song 'Aap Jaisa Koi' in Feroz Khan’s QURBANI (1980). The album got released in 1981 and I honestly cannot recall having any other pop-individual-album post that before the arrival of DIL PADOSI HAI.
 
Anyway, after getting inspired by its advertisement in SCREEN - the weekly newspaper/magazines and a strong recommendation of the friendly owner of the music shop, I did spend my entire pocket money saved on the album (as it was a 2 cassette set) and then frankly got disappointed listening to its content with only a couple or more songs making a decent impact. The set was kept aside after a few forced hearings and later I also tried to get it exchanged with some other film soundtrack but nobody agreed to that.
 
However, just a couple of years later when I got into learning music and was introduced to the blessed world of poetry, lyrics and rich Indian literature that someone suggested the name of the album once again. Picking it up from a corner of my collection I played it unexcitedly but got literally hooked to the tracks finding many finer details in the compositions, arrangements, lyrics and rendition together (even noticing the chorus and various sounds used innovatively).
 
Introducing to the world of independent music (not related to films) DIL PADOSI HAI connected me to two of my most cherished creative personalities, R. D. Burman and Gulzar, and the relation continues till date with their songs and poetry becoming an integral part of my regular music and reading sessions.
 
Dil Padosi HaiMost probably the first album featuring the three stalwarts together other than their usual film assignments, the work on DIL PADOSI HAI began while watching and hearing a particular piece in the background score of a James Bond film being played at home, as revealed by Asha Bhosle in one of her recent radio interviews given to Radio Nasha.
 
But what actually connected me back to the 2-cassette set a decade later was Jagjit Singh’s ghazal album MARASIM with Gulzar (released in 1999) in which the same ghazal from DIL PADOSI HAI, 'Shaam Se Aankh Mein Nami Si Hai' featured again in a different melodious composition (with two new verses) becoming the most famous track of the album yet again after more than a decade.
 
Coming back to the present, I hope Saregama (then HMV) have the complete album online, made available for the present generation. Since gems such as “Bheeni Bheeni Bhor”, “Koi Diya Jale Kahin”, “Juthey Tere Nain”, “Saawan Sasura Sataye”, “Shaam Se Aankh Mein”, “Rishte Bante Hain”, “Raat Chup Chaap”, “Saaton Baar Boley Bansi” and even a Christmas song “Raat Christmas Ki Thi” essentially need to be passed on to the new musicians as a part of our rich cultural heritage.
 
Not exactly having any title song, the phrase DIL PADOSI HAI was taken from the lyrics of track “Haan Mere Gham” and the album sleeve had short notes by both Gulzar and R.D. Burman along pictures of the three stalwarts enjoying together, sitting on a railway track in one and enjoying “Bhutta” in another as candid shots.
 
On a concluding note, DIL PADOSI HAI certainly was an album much ahead of its time coming in the year 1987. Though it could not become a big hit in those years for various reasons, it is now unanimously included in the list of exceptional works of the three masters Gulzar, R.D. Burman and Asha Bhosle by one and all. So if you are a young devoted singer, poet, musician or a passionate follower of great music, then do listen to the 14 tracks of this album and have a great enriching time with the trio.
 
Cheers! 
 
(Note: The article was also published on UC-News Mobile App in January 2018)

Tags : RDB-Asha-Gulzar’s first non-filmi album that was way ahead of its times by Bobby Sing, Dil Padosi Hai Album by R D Burman Asha and Gulzar, Articles on Poetry, Music and Life by Bobby Sing at bobbytalkscinema.com
04 Jan 2018 / Comment ( 0 )
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